A Family Homestead

Built on land owned by their family for more than 400 years, the summer home of Ron and Jane Bogle is now a part of the neighboring family homestead. “Pagoo’s Cottage,” as the family has dubbed it, is named after the hermit crab in Holling C. Holling children’s book, Pagoo, a family favorite.

ARCHITECT Greg Yalanis, AIA CONSTRUCTION BY Ross Construction STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING BY   Port City Consulting KITCHEN APPLIANCES BY Gil's Appliances PHOTOGRAPHED BY Diane Anton

ARCHITECT Greg Yalanis,AIA
CONSTRUCTION BY Ross Construction
STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING BY Port City Consulting
KITCHEN APPLIANCES BY Gil’s Appliances
PHOTOGRAPHED BY Diane Anton

Just down the road from “Pagoo’s Cottage” is Briggs Beach, the family beach where the Bogles have enjoyed summers for generations. Much as Ron’s parents enjoying watching him play in the water as a boy, Jane and Ron now enjoy watching their grandchildren. It is at this same spot that builder Richard Ross, owner of Ross Construction, once helped Ron’s father, Robert, work on the cottages set along the beach while he was in high school.

“I would help (Robert Bogle) collect seaweed off the beach and spread it out in the garden,” said Ross. “I remember chatting in the doorway of the barn that overlooks the land where “Pagoo’s Cottage” now stands and Robert saying to me that Ron would build a house there some day.”  Little did Ross know at the time that he would be the one to build it. “About a year and a half before we broke ground, Ron asked me if I would be interested in building their home and of course my answer was ‘yes,’” said Ross.

As soon as the decision to build was made, Jane and Ron hired Architect Greg Yalanis to design their cottage. Yalanis, who had met the Bogles through their daughter years earlier, shared common interests with the couple in both coastal architecture and interior design. Jane happens to be an interior designer herself. The Bogles and Yalanis and Ross hit it off right away. In fact, Jane now often refers to both men as family. It’s this familiarity that helped translate the couple’s dream into a reality.

“The entire family was involved in the design process. We knew that this would be an heirloom structure and part of the family for generations to come,” said Yalanis. “Having known the family so well, I understood their lifestyle and desire (for) a place where the family would spend time together, growing and enjoying the beach.”

Like Ross, Yalanis grew up on the water, often sailing with his grandfather, and it greatly influenced his design philosophy as an architect. ”My goal is to create architecture that responds to the unique nature of its location and defines a character that is influenced by the coastal environment and New England tradition” explained Yalanis, adding “My grandfather was an accomplished boat builder and my love for the structure of wooden boats and the craftsmanship involved in making them, translates directly into my work.”

With its angled roof linesand unique detailing, Yalanis’ love of craftsmanship is apparent in “Pagoo’s Cottage.” It is also evident inside the home. Together with Ross and Mike Camera, a structural engineer and owner of Port City Consulting in Portsmouth, Yalanis and the Bogles chose to use exposed heavy timber framing to highlight and define the interior spaces.

It was a decision that Camera heartily agreed with. “Too often in contemporary homes, traditional building elements are covered up with sheetrock and paint. It was nice that Greg and the Bogles wanted to highlight these beautiful structural elements,” said Camera.

Jane Bogle’s decorating also adds an element of the unexpected to the home, along with touches of whimsy. Her use of color and pattern is a true reflection of her warm and vibrant personality.  From the kitchen’s bold chartreuse countertop and cobalt blue tiled backsplash to the varying hues of red, yellow, blue and green used in nearly every room – color is everywhere, but it’s masterfully done with casual subtlety and an easy effortlessness.

Throughout “Pagoo’s Cottage, ”the Bogle family and their centuries-long connection to the land is noted with photographs and memorabilia spread throughout the home. Clearly, the family feels a deep connection to this place. In Pagoo, the hermit crab searches for and finds a new home. So, apparently, have the Bogles – for generations to come.

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